Science

Is this why 95% of our universe is missing? – India Today

Is this why 95% of our universe is missing? – India Today

This missing portion of the universe is normally separated into two separate and distinct physical phenomena, dark matter and dark energy, which are two of the biggest problems in modern astrophysics.

Is this why 95% of our universe is missing? - India Today - universe, today, missing, india

In this case, negative masses pop into existence, with space-time behaving as a foaming froth that resembles a sea of negative mass popcorn. It would look something like this cartoon, tweet Jamie Farnes.

Normal matter is the basic building block of humans, plants, and the solar system, but yet only comprises 5 per cent of all the matter in the universe.

The other 95 per cent is typically invisible, other than when its presence is inferred via gravitational effects.

This missing portion of the universe is normally separated into two separate and distinct physical phenomena, dark matter and dark energy, which are two of the biggest problems in modern astrophysics.

Now, the problem has been solved

A new toy model by Jamie Farnes of Oxford’s e-Research Centre, published in Astronomy & Astrophysics, suggests that both dark matter and dark energy can be unified into a single phenomenon — a fluid that has negative mass.

What does Farnes’s model indicate?

The model is a modified Lambda-CDM cosmology (the standard model of Big Bang that gives an account of properties of the cosmos), and indicates that continuously-created negative masses can resemble the cosmological constant and can flatten the rotation curves of galaxies in our universe. 

The model leads to a cyclic universe with a time-variable Hubble parameter, potentially providing compatibility with the current tension that is emerging in cosmological measurements. 

In the first three-dimensional N-body simulations of negative mass matter in the scientific literature, this exotic material naturally forms haloes around galaxies that extend to several galactic radii. 

These haloes are not cuspy. (The cuspy halo problem refers to a discrepancy between the inferred dark matter density profiles of low-mass galaxies and the density profiles predicted by cosmological N-body simulations)

The proposed cosmological model is therefore able to predict the observed distribution of dark matter in galaxies from first principles. 

The model makes several testable predictions and seems to have the potential to be consistent with observational evidence from distant supernovae, the cosmic microwave background, and galaxy clusters. 

In a Universe filled with both positive and negative mass matter, additional simulations also show that large-scale structure formation can still take place. The simulations generate a “cosmic web” of filaments and voids: 12/17 pic.twitter.com/qCKDbiHyUV

Jamie Farnes (@Astro_Jamie) December 5, 2018

What these findings imply

These findings may imply that negative masses are a real and physical aspect of our universe, or alternatively may imply the existence of a superseding theory that in some limit can be modelled by effective negative masses.

Both cases lead to the surprising conclusion that the compelling puzzle of the dark universe may have been due to a simple sign error.

Also read | Meet ‘Hyperion,’ the largest-ever galaxy supercluster in the early universe

Interested in General Knowledge and Current Affairs? Click here to stay informed and know what is happening around the world with our G.K. and Current Affairs section.

To get more updates on Current Affairs, send in your query by mail to education.intoday@gmail.com

Get real-time alerts and all the

news

on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from

Share:

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *